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@GDPR_HallOfShame Wikia is good like this too. Has a simple agree disagree in same colour and same size.

sitepoint is one of the good ones

A single click allows you to opt-out of tracking cookies (at least I hope so, I didn't check the developer tools)

I mean that, while I don't agree, I can understand the transaction in other services. The website has something valuable to visitors and requests data in return.

An e-commerce site however, wants to sell you stuff. Introducing themselves with asking for your data just because you want to watch their virtual display is a sad reminder of the normalization of data abuse.

Way to welcome the visitors to your shop, 3D_edge.

Nobody would think about welcoming you to their store with a few pages of agreements to sign right after you step in the door. Why is this acceptable online?

@GDPR_HallOfShame Visiting Europe a few weeks ago, I observed how the GDPR compliance was implemented on various sites.

I can only recall a single site doing it right: Allowing me to accept or not. Clicking on deny closed the popup and let me keep using the site.

A lot of sites allowed me to configure with whom to share my personal information, but most of the time everything was preselected.

They break the rules in their GDBR-specific popup. Not doing anything would have been better.

Yeah, linuxjournal, preach!

But first, could you pretty please create a compliant popup that allows us to not accept?

@GDPR_HallOfShame here's a fun one for you: go to independent.co.uk/news/world/a

The page auto-starts a video with very loud audio, that's already pretty bad form but the fun part is the gdpr popup that prevents you from clicking on the video at all to pause or mute it, as long as you haven't "accepted" the bloody thing.

Using loud noises to startle your users into clicking the big red accept button is a new one for me.

Dictionary.com belongs to the just because of the complexity of the popup, that occasionally appears scrolled out of screen.

Vice implements a two-step "reject all" popup with a minor dark pattern. I'm on the fence.

An easy way to circumvent GDPR and other region blockage is to use the wayback machine. Even if it doesn't have the link archived you can click "save this url in the wayback machine" and it gives you the current page, at the same time saving it, helping the archive.

At the same time let's admit caranddriver.com to the

I don't actually know what I agreed to on wordreference.com

I agree on the "show purposes" page where the checkboxes are unchecked fails woth the pictured alert, so I had to return and click the original button which I assume enables everythimg behind the scenes.

Hello world! Happy to finally be part of the Mastodon community. Follow us if you are interested in #privacy #personaldata #dataexploitation and #surveillance, we'll be talking a lot about these.

#newcomer #presentation

jamieoliver.com actually let's you opt in (closing the window leaves everything unchecked and the accept button is clearly marked) albeit with a (very) dark pattern.

Techradar presents the classic fullscreen modal which displays a 'reject all' link on page 2 and then proceeds to implore you to reconsider, because GDPR will protect you.

Ironic, weird and sad.

On the other side of the spectrum fstoppers provide one-click, non-modal decline.

If only it didn't look like it was disabled...

No, ImagingResource, it's not about appeasing bureaucrats, it's about respecting your readers.

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