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A venture capital backed firm decides to provide "free" DNS over HTTPS and DNS over Tor services to the public and we're supposed to believe that it is to protect our privacy.

"our policy is to never, ever write client IP addresses to disk and wipe all logs within 24 hours" till the next board meeting with investors. After that we'll start collecting all domain names you visited and sell that data to our real customers.
blog.cloudflare.com/welcome-hi

@njoseph
I actually believe that they do care about privacy and want to do good. The problem is if they become a centralized service as opposed to just another service users pick. Exactly that happens when software makers all decide to use the same provider on behalf of their users.

We need to let users choose their providers themselves or give them a randomized default from a list (of more than one) if they don't care.

#defaultmatters

@njoseph Keep calm - DoH is an open RFC - We just need to wait for implementors.

@njoseph Have you seen some of what Maciej Cegłowski ("Pinboard guy") has written about privacy and companies? He has a great suggestion for a legal change, whereby company could make legally enforceable privacy promises, and if they break them, executives can go to jail. It's an incremental step that could help in this case

idlewords.com/talks/what_happe

@njoseph
You don't know what's the point of Tor? Your IPaddr is not leaked to the resolver.

@federico3 My rant was about how DNS over Tor (which is hardly ever used) is being used to privacy-wash and legitimize the DNS over HTTPS service (used by most users, even unknowingly as a default setting in Firefox) which has no privacy for client addresses from Cloudflare itself.

This is a concern about a global DNS monopoly which offers its services for free and has to eventually monetize it to justify the cost. It usually ends up with surveillance capitalism.

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